Visitors' messages

Verification codesupported BB codes
Sort by Date Sort by Topic
Re[4]: A delightful read
from FlorenceFri, 17.11.2017 - 15:40:57 JSTReply
Dear Oka-san

It looks like we go to very much the same restaurants in this area. In fact, we also share your view about Fukunoya, which means we have not been back since our first time there.

Viccolino is actually one of our favourites and is on our rotation list for Saturday dinners. Another Italian restaurant on our list that we would highly recommend is Da Casetta. Not only is the quality of the food on par with a lot of the more famous (and often overrated) Italian restaurants in, say, Minato-ku, the prices are very reasonable. What I am most impressed about is the fact that the chef, Sato-san, is extremely passionate about his cooking. He frequently experiments with different recipes and seasonal ingredients, so the restaurant menu is never static, and a food order is often accompanied by a friendly explanation on how a particular dish on the menu came about. Both Sato-san and his assistant, Sahoda-san, are sommeliers, so they boast of a pretty good Italian wine selection as well.

I also have a sushi restaurant recommendation to share with you. Given that I’m not Japanese, I am probably not qualified to comment too much on sushi, but I must say that there is one sushi restaurant in Hamadayama that I go to every week (in fact, I just had lunch there today) and which I invariably bring all my family and friends to when they visit Tokyo, and that is Sushi Naito. Naito is not as famous as Kyubei in Ginza or ranked as highly on Tabelog as Murase in Roppongi, and its regular fan base is probably relatively small compared to the older players Iroha, Asahi and Kanroku in our area, but I find that Naito has a very unique style that agrees with my palate, and now that I’m used to the sushi there (particularly the “shari”), I can’t go to most regular sushi restaurants anymore. Naito may not suit everyone, and this is a gaikokujin commenting on a traditional Japanese cuisine, but if you have time, do try it out and let me know what you think.

And finally, if you ask me, I wish we had a Seiyu DIY centre and not a Seijo Ishii! No doubt the rent there requires a lucrative business like Seijo Ishii though. What a pity.

Florence


Re[3]: A delightful read
from WebmasterOkaThu, 16.11.2017 - 14:34:15 JSTReply
Dear Florence-san,

I am very surprised and impressed to know that you are so well informed about the recent changes of Hamadayama.

One of the allure of Hamadayama is certainly ts abundance in privately owned shops and restaurants. Regrettably, as the case of Marusho shows us, they are gradually disappearing. Hamanoyu (check Hamadayama) was the first case for me. The public bath with its nice traditional design, disappeared several years ago and Aeon now occupies the place. After “Marusho” a nice tofu-shop “Kawakami” was recently closed. (If you are looking for a good butchery, you can try “Shimura” in the Itsukaichi-Kaido near the Ozaki Bridge. Shimura is privately owned and as old as Marusho.)

But, it is also true that, as far as restaurants are concerned, new ones open one after another. I especially appreciate that we can now enjoy Chinese foods at very reasonable price in “Ran” as well as Vietnamese foods in “Cyclo”. “Viccolino” offers an interesting Italian food menu and “Vin and Sake 33” owned by the liquor shop Iseya is a nice French bistro with good Bourgogne wine. It’s also a good idea to sit at the counter of “Comedor Salud” and last not but least “Hamayama” in Kamakura-Kaido is a comfortable izakaya with plenty sorts of tidbits with creative idea. “Fumiyama-Seika” grocery next to the BMW showroom offers non-standard but good quality vegetables at bargain prices.

The tempura restaurant you mentioned is surely better than Tsuna-Hachi in Shinjuku, which is now crowded by foreign tourists, though I cannot assure you that it offers the best quality tempura. But, surely it is good enough for a residential area such as Hamadayama. Maybe, you should try it once and check with your own tongue! Another old restaurant in Hamadayama, Fukunoya, specialized in oden, is highly evaluated by many people, but their style does not fit my taste.

Ando is a good soba restaurant. Compared with Korin it offers more conventional style soba in a traditional-looking interior. I rather prefer Ando’s soba, though sakura-soba of Korin is attractive. Ando is closed on Tuesdays and Fridays.

I should also add that the old DIY section of SEIYU was where now SeijoIshii stands.

I still go to Nankai-Kitchen in Suzuran-dori in Kanda, to enjoy its Katsu-Curry! Maybe, I may have sat next to your husband one day.
Re[2]: A delightful read
from FlorenceWed, 15.11.2017 - 10:41:14 JSTReply
Dear Oka-san

Thank you for your reply.

You are certainly right that Hamadayama has been changing rapidly. In the 2 years or so that we have been here, we have witnessed Baskin-Robbins being replaced by a yakitori restaurant, a new Italian bistro opening along the shopping street, the car park next to Seiyu (presumably the old DIY part of Seiyu that your articles refer to?) being turned into an apartment building, Seiyu itself undergoing a renovation, the Morinaga employee dormitory transforming into an empty lot in the space of a few weeks (though it seems we can expect a new apartment building there soon), a new Japanese restaurant Asano (now one of our favourites) opening, and my beloved butcher Marusho being replaced by Origin Bento. In addition, on the way to work recently, I have noticed that the building which used to be a dry cleaner along the shopping street is in the process of being demolished. Too many changes to keep track of!

The Zenpukujigawa green belt is a very nice area. My husband does his jogging there all the time!

By the way, you have talked about Fujiyoshi the tempura restaurant in one of your articles. My husband and I were curious about that restaurant when we first moved to Hamadayama. On a couple of occasions, we tried to walk in but were told that a booking was required. Eventually, we kind of forgot about it and started frequenting other restaurants in the area. In light of your article though, I think we will actually make a booking and try it out. As for the soba restaurants Ando and Korin, we go to Korin from time to time, but we have noticed that Ando seems to be closed all the time? We both love eating out, so we have been reading your restaurant recommendations with great interest. In fact, my husband is impressed that you know about the katsu curry restaurant in Jinbocho. Apparently he used to go there all the time when he was a student!

No doubt you must be busy with Hana-chan and with your music, but we look forward to future updates on your website!

Re[1]: A delightful read
from WebmasterOkaTue, 14.11.2017 - 07:42:32 JSTReply
Dear Florence-san,

Welcome to Hamadayama and thank you for your entry.
Yes, I also find Hamadayama a very comfortable place to live. But, it is also changing rapidly and the information I wrote some years ago are already outdated. I am sorry that I am not much active recently in updating this site.

Our black coated Shiba, Hana, does not go to the shopping area. She goes for a walk twice a day to the Zempukuji-gawa green belt. It is a large green and really suited for dogs’ stroll. Every time Hana enjoys the feeling of grass-covered land and meets many dog friends, and we often go as far as Omiya-Hachiman.

Anyhow, please enjoy the life in Hamadayama.
A delightful read
from Florence Sun, 12.11.2017 - 14:08:16 JSTReply
Dear Oka-san

I am very thankful that you have taken the effort to detail the many aspects of your life in Japan on this website. My (Japanese) husband and I moved to Hamadayama in February 2016. It is our first time living in this area and we have grown to really enjoy the quiet yet cheerful and convenient surroundings. We recently stumbled across your blog by chance while randomly googling “Hamadayama” and must say that it has been a source of great delight to us. Not only have we learnt a lot about the Hamadayama area and the different aspects of living in Japan through your informative articles, we thoroughly enjoy your witty and engaging writing style.

We will look out for a black coated shiba inu called Hana when we walk along the shopping streets of Hamadayama and will come up and say hi. :)

Florence
Re[1]: ohisashiburi desu ne!!
from WebmasterOkaSat, 11.06.2016 - 10:25:00 JSTReply
Dear Denis-san,

You write wonderful Japanese.
Also thank you very much for returning to my web site.

You might have seen somewhere on this site. I retired last year and do now, apart from some part time job, enjoys my life. When I retired, I thought I could produce new web pages in much higher speed, but it was not the case. I have to dedicate to my hobby! Being a member of amateur orchestra needs much time for rehearsing and some office works for the organization. I cannot give instructions to younger colleagues but have to do everything by myself! In addition to music and electronic handicraft (I started to tackle PIC microcomputer and C program language in addition to analogue circuit designing), I now keep a dog! It is really a fun to have a dog. However, I have to dedicate much time to her. So, I do not have enough time for web site updating. But, I will do that anyway.

Now, I am in Izu in my cottage. It is a superb season. I can enjoy sunshine and greens. There are many deer! I saw yesterday on the way to home more than 50. Too many!
ohisashiburi desu ne!!
from Denis (korewa korewa^^)Wed, 08.06.2016 - 22:45:05 JSTReply
Dear Oka-san..its been a while since i wrote to you..
kono aida tegami wo dashita toki kara zuibun tatte shimai mashita..^^
go kigen iikaga?
ano..ne..watashi no nihongo..warawanai de ne..mada yokunai..
i hope you are doing well and in good health..
i see many new article to read..which i will do yorokonde..^_^
Okuribito eiga..kanarazu mita? :)

dewa kore de..
Re[1]: RSS Feed
from WebmasterOkaWed, 18.05.2016 - 22:13:24 JSTReply
Dear Amy,

Thank you for visiting my web-site and reading so many articles. Reading your comment on “the club of lost first love”, I could not help laughing! I can assure you that you will immediately be an honorary club member and invited to one of the club meetings, when you come to Tokyo!

I am now playing both violin and viola in amateur orchestras. We are always suffering from the shortage of good viola players. So, you are also welcome in that context.

Unfortunately, I don’t have a RSS feed. I make my web pages using only my hand-made programs. When I constructed the present site, I did not imagine I would need RSS feed ;- Of course, you are the first, who asked about the availability of RSS feed! In the future I might have one. So, please wait without much expectation.

BTW, your name “Amy” reminds me of a frequent reader of my old web-site. She came from Hong Kong and immigrated to Vancouver. Nowadays, it is not easy anymore to get to know people through private home pages. You need Facebook or some other social media in order to find friends through internet. But, I still stick to the old method.
RSS Feed
from AmyWed, 18.05.2016 - 09:19:53 JSTReply
Dear Webmaster,

I found your website while looking for community/amateur orchestras in Tokyo. My dream is to study Japanese and live in Japan. I used to play the viola in junior high school. One article led to another, and I found myself reading page after page of your writing. Thank you for the articles - it helped me to understand Japanese culture and the various shared group memories. I particularly enjoyed your humorous article on junior high school reunion and the rules for joining the club of lost first love :O) In that case, I think I can join the club too! Best regards and good health to you! By the way, do you have a RSS feed for your website? Thank you. I would like to subscribe for future articles.
Re[1]: Kanazawa and Noto Peninsula
from WebmasterOkaMon, 05.10.2015 - 11:10:56 JSTReply
Dear Jean,

Thank you for your wonderful comments. Indeed, if you stay in and around Tokyo, you can scarcely see Japanese traditional landscapes, because they have been destroyed not only by the earthquake and air raids but especially for the sake of economic development since the 1960s. My family comes from Kanazawa, exactly speaking from its suburbs facing the sea, Kanaiwa. Therefore, I feel a particular sympathy for Kanazawa and Noto.

I wrote the article related to Yuwaku-Onsen and a related anime series on response to the interest of an Italian friend, who was curious about the background of the anime which described the life of onsen-ryokan staff.

Somehow, the speed of destruction has been slower in the Western part of Japan, and of course especially in the economically backward areas like Noto. Such destruction continues even more intensively in the economic stagnation since the 1990s. You may not be able to imagine that hundreds of high-rise buildingsin Tokyo were constructed after the end of the Japanese economic boom. At the time of the economic “bubble” period around 1990, there were only a handful of skyscrapers in Tokyo such as Kasumigaseki-building, Hamamatsucho-building, Keio-Plaza Shinjuku, Ikebukuro Sunshine City and so on, and we could enjoy much wider sky at the time. Beautiful Japanese landscape has been continuously damaged for the sake of “zenekon” (general contractors), i.e. big construction companies such as Kajima, Shimizu and Takenaka ;-(